What To Do During Loadshedding: From Easy Suppers to Fun Pastimes

Loadshedding has been around for more than 10 years. According to Eskom, we can expect it to be around for at least a few more.

 

In this article, we offer:

Ideas for loadshedding activities

stargazing

We’re used to 24/7 access to the internet. This can make finding something to do during loadshedding seem like a challenge.

 

Here are some activities that don’t depend on electricity, for inspiration next time the lights go out.

 

Call a friend

Too often these days, we fail to take the time to catch up with friends and family. Short text messages just aren’t the same.

 

A good natter will make you completely forget that the lights are out. It could also comfort someone else who’s on their own, especially when the lights are off.

 

Look up to the stars

Invest in a telescope and take up astronomy with the kids.

 

Or keep things simple and just take a blanket outside. When is the last time you cleared your mind completely and watched the night sky?

 

This is just as magical for kids if your knowledge of constellations is pretty poor. Never mind Orion – that looks like a shopping cart!

 

Play with pets

Give your pets some extra love and attention. Play with them or give them a good groom.

 

Look at family photos

Take a trip down memory lane by looking at old photos. You’ll need some focused light – but candles will do.

 

Have children? Kids (of all ages) love looking at photos of themselves when they were younger.

 

This may also be a good opportunity to sort out piles of photos, putting them in albums or choosing ones to frame.

 

Take time to meditate

Use the quiet and lack of distractions to meditate.

 

Soak in a bubble bath

Relax in a hot bubble bath complete with candles. You won’t even remember that the power is down.

 

Read out loud

Take turns reading your favourite book or poem out loud to your partner or kids.

 

This may seem old-fashioned. But don’t be surprised if it makes people in your family secretly look forward to loadshedding. Dim light can make a story session seem even cosier than it otherwise would.

 

Play a game

If you have sufficient light, a board game or puzzle is fun. Charades is another classic and can be entertaining even in low light.

 

Get a head start on a domestic chore

A power outage can be a good time to chop veggies, give a room a bit of a dusting or even do out a clothing cupboard. You’ll need a decent light source, just for the area where you work – a rechargeable light or even a powerful torch.

 

Don’t just sit and wait for the power to come back on. It’s much more rewarding to do something.

 

Cooking during loadshedding

If you own a gas stove, you’ll still be able to cook when the power is out. You may still need to invest in a stove-top kettle for tea and coffee. Here are some useful ideas for cooking during loadshedding.

 

Single-plate cooking

Self-contained single gas plates aren’t expensive and can be stored when not in use. They’re intended for camp cooking but work well in the kitchen.

 

gas plate

Source: Takealot

 

Here are some single-plate recipe ideas to get you started:

Use a hotbox or Wonderbag

wonderbag

Source: Wonderbag

 

A Wonderbag or hot box uses insulation to keep a pot of food warm and allows it to keep cooking for up to 12 hours. It’s essentially a non-electric slow-cooker. If your power goes out when a dish is in the oven, transfer it to the hot box and it will keep cooking (albeit slowly).

 

Have a braai

For South Africans, an obvious solution when the power is out is to start a fire and have a lekker braai!

 

You might try experimenting with some new braai recipes.

 

Examples that don’t require electricity include most meats, potatoes and other vegetables cooked in foil, braai broodtjies, potjie, toasted marshmallows and braai bread.

 

Useful safety precautions during loadshedding

candles

South Africans may be accustomed to power outages. But accidents are still more likely when the lights are out. It pays to take a few simple precautions.

 

Have your alternative lighting ready

Have torches, candles, matches or solar lights set up and ready to go, so you’re not caught short when the lights go out.

 

Clear walkways of obstacles

Keep walkways and stairs free of clutter so you can move around the house in low light or the dark without risking a fall.

 

Keep an eye on candles

Make sure children and pets can’t knock candles over and start a fire. Never leave candles unattended.

 

Make sure the oven, hob or hot elements are off

Go round the home and check that all heating elements are off.

 

When the power comes back, they could heat up and could cause a fire or burn. This is especially a worry if you’ve gone to bed or left the house.

 

Make sure your phones are charged

In the hours before the power goes off, make sure all devices are charged or topped up.

 

Useful items for loadshedding

You might consider investing in some of these items to see you through the next few rounds of loadshedding.

 

Inexpensive items

Some recommended items for loadshedding – ranging from cheap to moderately priced – include:

  • long-burning tealight candles (they’re double the standard height)
  • a rechargeable handheld light
  • a single gas plate
  • an automatic plug-in light that can detect power outages
  • a gas heater to stay warm
  • solar chargers or power banks
  • gas stove kettle.

More expensive (but useful) items to consider

Given predictions that loadshedding could continue for several more years in South Africa, it could be worth investing in a few more expensive items.

 

Some useful examples:

  • UPS to keep your devices and Wi-Fi on
  • closed combustion fireplace
  • solar or gas geyser
  • gas stove and oven
  • a generator.

About XtraSpace

At XtraSpace, we can’t help keep the power on – but we hope you enjoyed our ideas of what to do during loadshedding.

 

XtraSpace offers clean, secure self-storage units, ideal for personal and business use. Contact us for more information or browse to find a branch near you.

 

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